Addax Antelope

We currently house African Addax Antelope and are acquiring additional breeding females.

The Addax is very high on the IUCN’s red list as “critically endangered” and their numbers in the wild are dwindling. Hunting and geographic degradation are among the leading causes of the declining numbers in nature.

This gentle antelope sometimes referred to as the “white antelope” comes from the Sahara Desert. They reside in groups of 6-20 members and are generally led by the eldest female. They mainly forage on grasses and shrubs as they wonder the arid landscape.

The average male Addax stands approximately 42 inches at the shoulder with the females being slightly shorter. Males can weigh up to 275 pounds and females are generally a third smaller. The females have a gestation period of nine months and are sexually mature at age 2-3. They give birth to a single calf that usually weighs in at 10 pounds.

Today it is estimated that less than 300 individuals now survive in the wild and those numbers are decreasing. Thanks to conservation efforts there are over 1000 animals now in the US and the SSP program is working hard to help ensure their survival.

Here at The WCC we are actively participating in breeding and research to do our part in this very important conservation effort. Future plans are to provide genetically sound animals for reintroduction programs.

2849
IN CAPTIVITY
58
IN THE WILD
3
OUR HERD